Art movements I – N

By | January 3, 2014

Art Movements I – N

 

Claude Monet - Impression, Soleil levant, 1872.

Claude Monet – Impression, Soleil levant, 1872.

Impressionism

Impressionism was a 19th century art movement. The name of the movement is derived from the title of a Claude Monet work, Impression, Sunrise (Impression, soleil levant 1872. Characteristics of Impressionist painting include visible brushstrokes, open composition, emphasis on light in its changing qualities.

The emergence of Impressionism in the visual arts was soon followed by movements in other media which became known as Impressionist music and Impressionist literature.

Artists: Mary Cassat, Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Eduard Manet, Berthe Morisot, Camille Pisarro, Pierre Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley, Claude Monet, Frédéric Bazille, Eugéne Boudin.

Tete d` Otage nr 20, Jean Fautrier, 1944

Tete d` Otage nr 20, Jean Fautrier, 1944

Informel art, Art Informel, Tachisme, L’art informel

Tachisme (alternative spelling: Tachism) derived from the French word tache – stain, and was a French style of abstract painting in the 1940s and 1950s. It is often considered to be the European equivalent to abstract expressionism. Other names for this movement are l’art informel  and abstraction lyrique. The Cobra group artists are also related to Tachisme and also Japan’s Gutai group. Tachisme was a reaction to cubism and is characterized by spontaneous brushwork and  drips and blobs of paint.

Artists: Jean Dubuffet, Jean Fautrier, Georges Mathieu, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Pierre Soulages, Henri Michaux, Wols, Antoni Tapies, Zao Wou-Ki.

Vulcan surprises Venus and Mars, Jacopo Tintoretti, ca. 1551

Vulcan surprises Venus and Mars, Jacopo Tintoretti, ca. 1551

Mannerism, ca 1520 – ca 1620

Mannerism is a period of European painting, sculpture, decorative arts and  architecture. The word derives from the Italian maniera (= style) which corresponds to an artist’s characteristic touch or recognizable manner.

Artists: Jacopo da Pontormo, Rosso Fiorentino, Guilio Romano, Parmigianino, El Greco, Bartholomeus Spranger, Adrian de Vries, Angelo Bronzino.

Minimalism, 1960s – 1970s

Minimalism is an art movement in various forms of art and design, especially visual art, where the work is stripped down to its most fundamental features. As a specific movement in the arts it is identified with developments in post-World War II Western Art, most strongly with American visual arts.

Artists: Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, Robert Morris, Donald Judd, Carl Andre, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Agnes Martin, Brice Marden.

Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, Georges-Pierre Seurat, 1884 – 1886.

Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, Georges-Pierre Seurat, 1884 – 1886.

Neo-Impressionism, 1890s

Neo-Impressionism is a term coined by the French art critic Félix Fénéon in 1887 to characterise the art movement led by Georges Seurat and Paul Signac. Fénéon’s term pointed to the roots of this recent development in the visual arts in Impressionism, but offered at the same time a fresh reading of artistic means like colour and line based on the practice of Seurat and Signac.

Artists: Georges-Pierre Seurat, Paul Signac, Henri Edmond Cross, Charles Angrand.

Mars and Venus, Johan Tobias Sergel

Mars and Venus, Johan Tobias Sergel

Neoclassicism, ca 1770 – ca 1840

Neoclassicism is the name given to movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw upon Western classical art and culture, usually that of Ancient Greece or Ancient Rome. These movements were dominant at various times between the 18th and 20th centuries.

Artists: Jean Auguste Ingres, Jaques-Louis David, Antonio Canova, Bertel Thorvaldsen, A.R. Mengs, Gavin Hamilton, Joseph-Marie Vien, Johan Tobias Sergel.