Volume, shadows, depth – 4

By | February 2, 2014
Volume, shadows, depth, modules, details, blurring and an image composition.

Volume, shadows, depth, modules, details, blurring and an image composition.

Composition – Shadows create volume Composition – Shadows create volume Composition – Shadows create volume

Composition – Shadows create volume

Shadows are important and space creating. Sometimes shadows can explain volumes much better than the object itself. A flat circle becomes a ball through the appearance of a shadow. Example: Edgar Degas (1834-1917)


Modules create space Modules create space

Modules create space

Modules with a similar shape, but in different sizes, create space. Three or more creates a stronger effect than two. Example: Francesco Guardi (1712-1793).


Repoussoir Repoussoir Repoussoir

Repoussoir

Repoussoir (from French = pull back), is the secret of all postcard photographers to create a depth in the images. To create this depth you position an object in the foreground of the image. Example: Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840)


Details – blurring Details – blurring

Details – blurring

Details are brought forward in an image and blurring is pushed to the horizon. This is how we see things with our eyes and can be used to create space. Example: Turner (1775–1851)


Atmospheric perspective. Lighter towards the horizon Atmospheric perspective. Lighter towards the horizon

Atmospheric perspective. Lighter towards the horizon

Air perspective. Lighter colours are perceived as further away. Example: J. M. W. Turner (1775-1851)


Saturated colours appear closer than unsaturated colours. Saturated colours appear close

Saturated colours appear closer

Saturated colours appear closer than unsaturated colours. Example: Lars Hertervig (1830-1902)